Suicide Journal Instruction to the Way of Life

Suicide Journal Instruction to the Way of Life

Note: Italics are utilized to indicate scripture.

The goal of the Suicide Journal Instruction to the Way of Life is to extend the life of a desperate person by five days by journaling their feelings and reading their responses on subsequent days of the journal process. This journal is a three-step process.
Step one: admit to yourself that you have suicidal thoughts.
Step two: get a pen and paper. Write on anything that you can, even the wall or the mirror.
Step three: write down your thoughts on paper and answer question 1, question 2, and question 3.
Question 1. To be asked on journal day one. Can I wait until tomorrow to take my life?
Question 2. To be asked on journal day two through four. Upon reading my journal notes from yesterday, is my situation any less desperate?
Question 3. To be asked on journal day five. Upon review of my journal notes: is there an improvement in my will to live? And is there a glimmer of hope that my life has value?

Further instruction of the process: Your life has value. Life is what you make of it. What you put into it is the very thing that you get out of it.
John 15:22(KJV) If I had not come and spoken unto them, they had not had sin: but now they have no cloak for their sin.

In this verse, Jesus speaks of a cloak or a hiding place. A cloak is something that conceals or hides. The fact that you have gotten this far in the Suicide Journal packet shows you have become honest with yourself. You have removed the cloak that the only answer to your problem is suicide. There must be another answer to the question: “Should I take my own life today?”

The first question that needs to be asked: “Is there any value to my life?” The second question is: “Can I add value to my life?” The answer to question one is YES. All life comes from God, and this alone QUALIFIES YOU asVALUABLE. The answer to question two is also YES. Adding value to your life is a daily process. You are the only one who can do this. You must understand that your thoughts are trying to kill you, and this is not of God. Mankind was created in God’s Own image, and any opinion contrary to that is not of God.

John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
John 6:57
 “As the living Father sent Me, and I live because of the Father, so he who feeds on Me will live because of Me.
This journal is a three-step process.
Step one: admit to yourself that you have suicidal thoughts.
Step two: get a pen and paper.
Step three: write down your thoughts on paper and answer question 1, question 2, and question 3.

DAY ONE:

Question 1. Can I wait until tomorrow to take my life? This answer will have to come from the heart, and a NO answer must be dismissed. You must be strong and say, “YES, I CAN LIVE ANOTHER DAY.”
DAY TWO: 

Question 2. Upon reading my journal notes from yesterday, is my situation any less desperate? Your life must not be as hopeless on day two as it was on day one because you made it through the night. What did you write in your journal yesterday? Please read it and re-read it, you are the author. Rebuild your life based on the value that you have found between day one and day two.
DAY THREE: 

Continue to expand your thoughts and be honest with yourself. A big part of getting rid of suicidal thoughts is to be honest with yourself. If you tell yourself that you have no value long enough, eventually you will start to believe it. Truth begins within and expands to the outside in the form of value. Self-value and God are the cure to suicidal thoughts.
DAY FOUR:

This is a reinforcement of day three. If you are on day four, then you have added four days of value to your life.
DAY FIVE: 

Question 3. To be asked on journal day five. Upon review of my journal notes, is there an improvement in my will to live? And is there a glimmer of hope that my life has value? 

At this point in the journal process, you should have five days of journal notes to review. That is five days of value that you have added to your life. If you have become honest with yourself, you now have your honest opinion to draw from. This journal is the person you have become over the last five days. You have become honest with yourself and have put aside your suicidal thoughts for the previous five days. Take council in your journal by using your own words to find value in your life. If you take your life, you would no longer have it, and you can never get it back. Be warned that you are weak and in need of help. At the very least, you will need to continue to journal, reading, and re-reading your thoughts. Just because you made it to day five or day six doesn’t mean that you can’t go back to your darkest hour. Press on and add value to your life every day through honesty and truth.
John 15:26But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me.

Remember, suicide is an act of a person intentionally taking their own life. If the act of suicide is never started, then the act of suicide can never be finished. Life moves on, moves along with it, and begin to direct your path in honesty and truth. The new beginning starts here and now.

National Suicide Prevention lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Tim is a retired firefighter of 32 years. He loves his beautiful wife, Jilean, and their four grown children and two grandchildren.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.